A Tribal Town with Tourism Potential

Located at an altitude of 2195 meters, Bharmour, a tribal township, is 65km away from the district headquarters of Chamba and is famous for 7th century's temples. Bharmour remained the capital of the erstwhile state of Chamba till 920 A.D. after which the capital was shifted to Chamba by Raja Sahil Verman.
Bharmour is known primarily for ancient temples such as Chaurashi temple, Bharmani Mata temple and religious center like Manimahesh, situated at an altitude of 4170 meters. The ancient temple and monuments in these holy places are of great architectural and archaeological interest to researchers and historians.
Owing to its hoary background, domestic and foreign tourists are enthralled by the scenic beauty of Bharmour which is in the trekking routes to Lahul and Spiti, Baijnath and Dharamshala.
Its tourism potential is large owing to the high passes like Kalichho, Chobia, Kugti, Jalsu and Quarsi which straddle the area. Besides there are places of pilgrimage such as Chowrasi, Banni Devi temple, Kailing, Kartik and finally Manimahesh. Now, nearly one lakh pilgrims visit the Manimahesh Lake annually.
For tourists, there is a PWD Rest House, Mountaineering Institute sub centre and a plethora of guest houses, hotels and restaurants by giving loans at a low rate of interest, besides subsidies.
Manimahesh is considered to be the adobe of Lord Shiva and the state government has provided facilities to pilgrims visiting the place during August-September.
The state government is planning to connect Bharmour with Baijnath by road. About 50km of road remains to be built to link this tribal region with Kangra valley. When completed, this will provide the shortest route to Bharmour from Kangra valley as well as to Mandi and Shimla.
The tourism department has also undertaken the construction of a Yatriniwas at Bharmour in addition to a sarai at Hadsar, a sub-center of the Western Himalaya Mountaineering Institute, Manali, is also coming up on the left bank of the Ravi at Holi. It would provide the much-needed fillip to the promotion of tourism to this tribal region.


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